Tag Archives: car photography

2011 BMW 335i Review

bmw 11

You are probably confused and wondering why I am reviewing another E90 (2006-2011 generation) 3 Series if I have already reviewed both a 328i Sedan and a convertible. Well those were the 328i versions, and this is a 335i version. For those of you who know, my sister now drives the Pilot, and so I drive my father’s 2010 BMW 328i. One of my friends has a 2011 335i, and it is exactly the same color and the same generation as mine, so I thought, why not just do a review on his BMW? It may be another E90, but it is a 335i. The 335i is the top dog version with a turbocharged inline six cylinder engine whereas the lesser 328i versions make do with a normally aspirated inline six cylinder engine. The first 3 Series started with the E21 in 1975. At this time, BMW was cementing a reputation as a purveyor of “ultimate driving machines,” a strategy that culminated in the making of some very fine driving machines until recently. After the E21 came the 1982-1991 E30 which launched the first ever M3, then came the 1993-1998, then the 1999-2005 E46, then the 2006-2011 E90. Funny thing is that even as the BMW 3 Series slowly grew in size and status, it remained the undisputed compact luxury sedan in terms of prestige, sales, and driving enjoyment. No matter what other competitors threw at it, the BMW reigned supreme. After reviewing an E30 M3, E36 325i convertible, E46 330i, and two E90s, I can attest to that. I would not include the present generation F30 as one of the all time BMW driving greats because it is part of BMW’s new comfort oriented philosophy. The older the generation, the better driving characteristics they possess, but they are all fantastic to drive except the 2012-present F30 (which actually has started losing comparisons in automotive publications due to its worse handling). Since I drive a 328i, I was curious to see whether the twin turbocharged engine makes the 335i a better car than the 328i.  Continue reading

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

2011 Chevrolet Camaro SS Review

camaro 4

When foreigners judge Americans in terms of cars, the first thing that pops to mind are pickup trucks. Which makes sense considering that a Ford F-Series truck has been our best selling automobile for the past 32 years (according to Wikipedia). However, there is one other thing we are also known for: our muscle cars. America has a long history of shoving big horsepower engines into sporty cars, a craze that started back in the Roaring Sixties. When the economy was booming, American manufacturers wanted to add fun to their lineups. Ford was the first to jump start this idea with the 1964 Mustang. Then Chevrolet, a division of General Motors, created the Camaro three years later. So did Dodge two years later with the Challenger. The three of these muscle cars coined the term “pony muscle car.” The Camaro also spawned a twin, the Pontiac Firebird. The Chevrolet Camaro lasted for four generations until Chevrolet discontinued it in 2002. By the time the fourth generation arrived, the Camaro and its twin, the Pontiac Firebird became more like big sporty coupes rather than sports cars. Due to lackluster sales and the market’s decreasing appetite for sporty coupes, General Motors discontinued the Camaro and the Firebird. However, in 2006, Chevrolet showcased the Camaro Concept at the 2006 Detroit Auto Show to unexpected levels of acclaim and praise from spectators worldwide. The Camaro became more prominent, especially in its role as Bumblebee in the Transformers series. The overwhelming demand for the Camaro was too much for Chevrolet to ignore, so they made the decision to produce the Camaro as a 2009 model. The release date got pushed to spring 2009 to produce the Camaro as a 2010 model. The Camaro was designed and engineered by GM’s Australian division, Holden, and it was built off the “Zeta” architecture that underpinned many Holden vehicles. After reviewing a Mustang, and a Challenger, I was anxious to review a Camaro. However, you may remember that I will refuse to review a car unless it is in the proper specification. That’s right, I told myself I would review Camaros only with a manual transmission. Problem is that this is America. Luckily, the opportunity presented itself soon enough, and it was not just any version of the Camaro, it was the top of the line version, the SS!  Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

1997 Volkswagen Jetta GLX VR6 Review

jetta 12

Even though the Volkswagen Jetta is popular as a “chick car”, I never got around to reviewing one because as you might have guessed, I refused to review an automatic Jetta. When I was growing up, I always had a fondness for the third generation Jetta. I loved the boxy looks of it, and how with a spoiler and the blacked taillights, it resembled a sports sedan. My friend’s mom let me come to her office to review her coworkers’ cars, and she knew I only wanted to do manual cars, so she let me look around the parking lot. I came to this beautiful green Jetta, and I looked inside, and sure enough, it was a manual. Not only that, this is the top dog GLX VR6. I got so excited that I started sputtering facts about the VR6 engine and random details of the Jetta that she could not help but get annoyed. Moving back to the Jetta, the original Jetta debuted in 1979 as a sedan version of the Golf hatchback. It was literally a Golf with a trunk crafted on. Back then, European cars were typically hatchbacks, and sedan versions of the hatchbacks were basically a hatchback with a trunk instead of a hatch. The Mk1 Jetta (generations of the Jetta are classified by MK’s) was designed by Giorgetto Guigiaro, a famous car designer known for designing Ferraris and Lamborghinis. Given that European cars sold in North America at the time were expensive luxury cars, the affordable Jetta became the best selling European model in the continent. The MK1 Jetta was praised for its handling and performance, but less so for reliability. The second generation Jetta arrived in 1984, and it retained its title as the best selling European car in North America, and another redesign followed in 1993, boasting a more aerodynamic look as well as an increase in refinement and quality. The VR6 version here is the high performance version of the Jetta, and it comes with a 172 horsepower narrow angled six cylinder engine.  Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

2011 Ford Mustang V6 Photoshoot

mustang 20

Remember this car? This was one of the first cars I’ve reviewed on this blog. You can check out the review here. I was stumbling through my pictures and I came across these. My friend and I had some time to kill in the summer, so why not have an impromptu photo shoot? My friend and I had a lot of memories in this car. I still remember the noise it makes when it hits 3,000 rpm, and the slippery leather seats. I remember they were slippery because my friend has the Mustang Driver Complex which means Fast and Furious is his style of driving. Anyways, it handles well, the six speed manual is smooth, and the styling is spot on. It is a sweet ride. Hope you like the pictures!

On a side note, for anybody into German cars, check out my friend’s blog http://germanluxurycarss.com/ !

Tagged , , , , , , ,

2006 Mercedes-Benz S430 Photoshoot

s430 48

I was hired to photograph this sweet 2006 Mercedes-Benz S430. My client actually found me through my S55 AMG review. I did get to drive this car, although not enough to warrant an actual review, but it drives similarly to the S55 that I tested. It is slower, but it still drives nicely. As for the styling, I love how it combines elegancy and sleekness and I think that this was one of the best looking S-Classes ever. It is hugely comfortable with supreme leather seats and loads of room. Anyways, I hope you guys enjoy the pictures!

Tagged , , , ,

2013 BMW X5 XDrive35i Review

    bmw 5

Just like many other SUVs on sale today, the X5’s birth was a result of the SUV boom in the late 1990s. When BMW acquired Land Rover in 1994, it commenced development on their own SUV. BMW looked at the Land Rover Range Rover’s technology which was incorporated during the X5’s development. In fact, the first generation X5 utilized a split rear liftgate similar to the Range Rover’s as well as shared its technology and electronics. The rest of the X5 was taken from the 5 Series sedan. Unlike other SUVs which boasted their off road prowess, the X5 placed emphasis on its on road ability with claims of carlike handling and comfort. BMW dubbed the X5 as a Sport Activity Vehicle (SAV). Given that the SUV market was clamoring for luxury SUVs, the X5 was a runaway success when it launched in 1999. The X5 was praised for its sporty handling, quality interior, and its quick acceleration. It was also the first and last X5 to be available with a manual transmission. In 2006, BMW redesigned the X5, and unlike the first, this second generation utilized only BMW technologies. In BMW speak, the X5 underwent a “Life Cycle Impulse” (facelift) in 2011. Continue reading

Tagged , , , ,

1994 BMW 325i Convertible Review

bmw 3

Even though BMW is currently one of the world’s most profitable brands, that was not always the case. In 1959, BMW faced financial difficulties, and stockholders convened to decide whether to keep the company running or to go into liquidation. BMW was in such bad shape that rival Mercedes-Benz was considering buying out BMW just to wipe its competitor out. The stockholders agreed to keep carrying on. The success of economy cars in Europe convinced BMW to focus on small cars. BMW was formerly an aircraft engine manufacturer, and it used its engine expertise in developing the cars. The result of this was the BMW Isetta, which helped BMW get back on its feet. BMW wanted to move upmarket as to challenge Mercedes-Benz with the BMW 3 series. The third generation 3 series (E36) builds on the traits of the previous two 3’s with more power and comfort. Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,